Loading…
32nd Annual Charleston Conference Issues in Book and Serial Acquisition

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Poster Sessions [clear filter]
Thursday, November 8
 

2:00pm

Breaking Boundaries in Scholarly Publishing

The evolution of digital has already led to significant developments within the publishing industry. New products, metrics, and notably business models have all had impact on scholarly communication, but what more changes can and should take place?

Over the past year, Palgrave Macmillan has undertaken a number of surveys to explore the publishing consumption behaviours of the market. Questioning over 1000 researchers across humanities and social science, the surveys reveal insights into publishing requirements as well as the still existing publishing boundaries - from the dominance of widely-accepted formats of articles and monographs, to interdisciplinary research, publication times, pricing flexibility and beyond.

This presentation will share the survey results and ask all stakeholders to consider what further boundaries we should be breaking in order to better meet the needs of the research community.


Speakers
avatar for Carrie Calder

Carrie Calder

Strategy Director, Open Research, Nature Publishing Group/ Palgrave Macmillan
Carrie has over 10 years’ experience of working in open access publishing and is a board member of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA).  Starting her publishing career at BioMed Central in 2003, Carrie was involved in the growth of BioMed Central’s journal... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

Can the Exorbitant Cost of Subscriptions to Digital Image Databases Still Be Justified?

With reduced or flat budgets and a proliferation of high resolution open access digital images, the time is opportune for appraising the necessity of subscriptions to expensive image databases in academic libraries. This talk will draw on a rich set of data drawn from art history courses taught in recent years at the University of Connecticut, both from the presenter, who is an adjunct instructor, and faculty colleagues. The data source is the actual slide lectures used in art history courses, in which all image sources are identifiable. Beginning with a comparison of the availability and quality of open access digital images with that of images in subscription databases, the paper will also draw upon postings to the ARLIS-NA listserv responding to a query about whether art librarians and visual resources curators are considering cancelling costly image database subscriptions. The results of a questionnaire about free vs. licensed-for-a-fee image use (posted on a variety of discussion lists and aimed at librarians and faculty) will also be presented. Equal consideration will be given to the divergent image needs of teaching, which demands high resolution images for lecture presentations, and research, which relies more heavily on scholarly compilations such as the Illustrated Bartsch. Part of the presentation will be interactive, and will include a brief demonstration of techniques for finding open access images on Web. The paper will conclude with a consideration of the evolving role of the art librarian in the academic environment , with its emerging emphasis on locating images for individual users , rather than maintaining repositories of retrievable images.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Young

Michael Young

Humanities Librarian, University of Connecticut
Michael Young is an art librarian and art historian, who works and teaches at the University of Connecticut. As a librarian who is also a heavy user of the library's collections as a researcher and an instructor in Art History, he approaches image databases and other library resources... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

Custom Financial Reports

This poster will illustrate one way to create an Excel custom report using financial data exported from an ILS. If you can export your financial data with the fund and associated fields (appropriations, expenditures, encumbrances) then you can format and present it any way you like.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Winecoff

Michael Winecoff

Associate Dean for Collection Services, UNC Charlotte
I am currently the Associate Dean for Collection Services and oversee Collections and Acquisitions. Before taking this position I gained valuable paraprofessional experience as a copy cataloger, catalog maintenance coordinator and supervisor of the Accounts Payable and Receiving section... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

Evaluation of Current Collection Practices via Patron-Driven Acquisition: A Case Study

The University of Alberta Libraries undertook a creative patron-driven acquisition project in order to more fully meet user needs as well as to evaluate current collection development procedures. The project was unique in that it involved on-demand purchase of both print and electronic titles, and the title selection pool included books previously passed over for purchase by subject selectors. Brief details of the project will be shared, and reflections to inform future PDA projects given.

Objective of the session

This poster will present the methods used to implement a PDA project that included both print and electronic titles. The benefits and challenges of incorporating print-based PDA will be explored. Since one of the goals of the project was to assess current collections policies, results that informed us in this regard will be presented. These relate to user preferences for format, identifying gaps in a collection, and meeting the needs of different user groups.

What attendees can expect to learn

Attendees can expect to learn more about using patron-driven acquisition not just as a collection development tool, but also for evaluation of current collection practices. They will learn about potential obstacles that may be encountered when initiating PDA projects, as well as possible solutions to overcoming those obstacles.


Speakers
avatar for Trish Chatterley

Trish Chatterley

Collection Strategies Coordinator, University of Alberta
Trish was the liaison library to the Faculty of Pharmacy for many years before moving into a newly centralized Collection Strategies Unit at the University of Alberta.


Thursday November 8, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

Everything That's Wrong with E-book Statistics - A Comparison of E-book Packages

Despite the existing Counter Code of Practice for e-books, there is a lack of a common standard for e-book statistics when it comes to defining “a download.” Publishers can deliver statistics on different levels; title level, chapter level or even page level, and still be Counter compliant. Because of these inconsistencies, a relevant comparison between publishers can’t be done. On top of that many of the e-book packages are not COUNTER compliant at all and include tables, graphs, videos and self-assessment tests in their statistics.

The lack of comparable statistics leaves acquisition librarians confused with no support in the renewal process, because there is no way of knowing how to compare "title” use and "page” use. It also makes it hard to establish value for money and to justify purchases to our stakeholders.

The objective of the presentation is to show how difficult it can be to analyze and compare usage statistics from different e-book packages. It will show examples of usage statistics from e-book packages at Uppsala university library and illustrate how complicated and complex the analysis gets when type of usage statistics in considered. This presentation has no easy solution to the problem, but it highlights the importance of a common standard for e-book statistics and higher awareness among librarians.


Speakers
avatar for Karin Byström

Karin Byström

Head, Section for e-resources, Uppsala University Library
Karin Byström is the head of the Section for e-resources at Uppsala University Library. She has worked with e-resources for three years and her main focus is e-books. She is currently the project manager for a national project on DDA as an acquisition model for academic libraries... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

Hidden Gems: Discovering Upstate Authors in the Stacks

In May 2011, Upstate Medical University Health Sciences Library started a weeding project of its main book collection.  Together with the help of our evening and weekend staff, student assistants and information resources team we were able to weed over 25,000 items in eleven months.  This poster will describe the interdepartmental workflow, the low-tech communication style we employed and how we were able to successfully weed a collection without throwing away a single book.

This poster will also explain how we capitalized on an unexpected benefit of the weeding project. Since our collection development policy clearly states that items with faculty contributions are retained the identification of faculty authors in books, something that had long been an obstacle, became an opportunity.  Learn how we identified Upstate authors and contributors; made them discoverable through our catalog; and what we are doing to continue these efforts.


Speakers
RK

Rebecca Kindon

Information Resources Librarian, Upstate Medical University, Health Sciences Library
Rebecca started at Upstate Medical University in 2005 as a reference librarian.  In 2010 she became the Information Resources Manager overseeing acquisitions, serials and electronic resources.  She earned her MLS degree from Syracuse University.


Thursday November 8, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

Making the CAP Fit

In 2006 the Ottenheimer Library at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) completed a comprehensive strategic plan. One objective of the plan was to identify and develop a model to assess the collections. The University’s growing enrollment of graduate students and the University administration’s expectations of increased faculty research provided the impetus for investigating a model. For the last six years members of the Library faculty and staff have conducted the Collection Assessment Project (CAP), a self-study project developed by the Association for Research Libraries. The Library is currently implementing recommendations which emerged from the teams’ findings and preparing policies and procedures to measure and streamline collection development activities.

We will share our experiences in conducting CAP, in writing the Interim and Final reports, and in the first stages of implementing the recommendations. We will outline what we learned about ourselves, the mistakes we made, and how we plan to continue the analysis of how the Library can best provide what its users must have to teach, learn, and do research.


Speakers
MJ

Maureen James

Collection Development Librarian, University of Arkansas at Little Rock Ottenheimer Library
Maureen is the Collection Development Librarian at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. She is an avid gardener and loves to cook.
DR

Donna Rose

Head of Cataloging, University of Arkansas at Little Rock Ottenheimer Library
Donna Rose is the Head of Cataloging at Ottenheimer Library at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. She holds a MLIS from Vanderbilt University/George Peabody College. 


Thursday November 8, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

Still on the Fence about PDA Purchasing? Try a Conservative Approach
Is the idea of starting a PDA program alarming? Are you intrigued, but concerned about how to begin? Looking for a “jumping off” point to start an informed conversation with the administration at your library? Consider your current, well-established profiles to be a safety-net, and the basis for adding in Patron Initiated Purchasing. That’s what a mid-size, midwest university did. They took a conservative approach to PDA by looking at the print profiles already in place with their approval vendor. Since the subject librarians and faculty were confident in the quality and selection of the print material coming in on approval, it was decided that the profile would be the basis for the PDA selections. This minimized the popular concerns about PDA – poor quality, “opening the collection” too widely, lack of control over acquisitions spending. Sections of the profile that were “e-book preferred” could easily be turned into PDA options. Other areas that had been designated to deliver notification slips were included in the pilot. Careful consideration and open dialog between the library and the vendor were essential to creating a plan that works well. Spoiler Alert: After a year of purchasing against rather tight profile parameters – the subject librarians are now considering taking a more “open” approach for PDA.

Speakers
PG

Pamela Grudzien

Director of Acquisitions, Metadata and Resource Sharing Services, Central Michigan University Libraries
Pamela has many years of library experience in public services, collection development, resource sharing, and more recently, technical services.  This varied experience has provided her with a well-rounded perspective of academic library services, challenges, and opportunities. Her... Read More →
LM

Lisa McDonald

Account Manager, Ingram-Coutts
Lisa has been with Ingram Academic since 2010. She is the Account Manager for college, university and federal libraries in the Central and Mountain U.S. Prior to joining the Ingram team, she worked in OCLC's Cataloging and Metadata Services group for 10 years and also spent one year... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

Sub Group Response Variability in the LibQUAL+TM Information Control Dimension

LibQUAL+TM is a tool that libraries use to assess service quality internally and to compare against peer institutions. However, analysis of sub groups within disciplines is not well represented in the literature. In an ever changing academic environment, customization of service changes the status quo and leads to best practices. Surely, most librarians are familiar with this tool and conversations about different global experiences will keep the session lively and informative.


Speakers
avatar for Ibironke Lawal

Ibironke Lawal

Science and Engineering Collections Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
I have been at VCU for over a decade as collections librarian and liaison to the School of Engineering and science departments in the College of Humanities and Sciences. Developing and maintaining relevant collections, providing effective service to students, moving them toward academic... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

To Keep, or Not to Keep: The Effect of Discovery Tools on Licensed Resources

For the last few years, libraries have been acquiring discovery tools in effort to make it easier for users to find their licensed and unique local content. Vendors have touted the discovery tools' ability to speed up the research process and increase usage of the collection. However, has the entire collection seen an increase in usage? Are resources not indexed by discovery tools still being used? How will this affect decisions to cancel, keep, or acquire resources? This poster session will share the usage analysis and collection management issues that Florida State University faces after implementation of a discovery tool.


Speakers
avatar for Apryl Price

Apryl Price

Head of Acquisitions and Collection Development, University of North Florida
Apryl is Head of Acquisitions and Collection Development at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville. Previously, she was the Electronic Resources Collection Management Librarian at Florida State University Libraries. Professional interests include electronic resource management... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

Using Data Visualization Tools for Collection Analysis

This poster session will share our assessment of data visualization tools like RapidMiner, ManyEyes, DabbleDB, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, and Google to determine the most practical and feasible way for a small academic library to analyze our collection and demonstrate the value of library collections. Librarians at Marymount University in Arlington, VA are exploring ways to use data visualization for collection analysis on a shoestring and without a programmer. With a large cut to our budget at a University moving to zero-based budgeting, we needed to be able to demonstrate the value of library collections, identify collection strengths and weaknesses, and allocate funds to support the most critical areas of the curriculum. We are collecting patron borrowing data from our ILS, electronic resource usage data, and pairing it with program information . Attendees can expect to learn about free and inexpensive ways to use data visualization tools for collection analysis and to show the University community the value of library collections.


Speakers
BS

Barbara Siller

Technical Services Librarian, Marymount University
GV

Gwen Vredevoogd

Collection Development Librarian, Marymount University
Gwen Vredevoogd is Collection Development Librarian at Marymount University.  She has been an academic librarian for fifteen years, coordinating collection management to support the curriculum, managing electronic resources, providing reference and liaison services, and teaching... Read More →
HM

Hongqiang Mason Yang

Electronic Services Librarian, Marymount University
Mason Yang has been the Electronic Services Librarian at Marymount University since Feb, 2010. Before joining Marymount University, he worked as a Reference Librarian for the Loudoun County Public Library for 4 years. Mason Yang started his professional career as a part-time librarian... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom
 
Friday, November 9
 

2:00pm

Doing Better with Less: Strategies to Transform Technical Services at the University of Nevada, Reno

In early 2010, Technical Services at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) Libraries established a Technical Services transformation plan with three strategic directions for a five-year period: 1) strive to build seamless information access services around user workflow; 2) respond to new technologies and user habits to develop new services; and 3) strive to achieve optimal operational efficiency through outsourcing, automation, and streamlining. Ever since then, major projects have been initiated and worked on to move in these directions.  However, continuous staff loss later presented huge obstacles to our ambitious endeavors. To forge forwards, we deployed a number of management strategies to bring the division through a very difficult time and laid a strong foundation for the future. Our strategies include a major re-organization through joining forces of technical services and collection development, adopting a co-management model for the division, creating a new Knowledge Access & Discovery Librarian position and forming an (Access) Discovery and Design department from existing staff, and empowering support staff through professional development and other activities. This poster will present our transformation plan and key projects, with a focus on the management strategies we took to move in these directions in the face of drastic staff reduction.  Lessons learned will be shared. Attendees will be invited to share their own experiences of doing better with less.


Speakers
avatar for Paoshan Yue

Paoshan Yue

Head of Electronic Resources & Acquisitions, University of Nevada, Reno
Paoshan Yue is the Head of Electronic Resources & Acquisitions Services at the University of Nevada, Reno Libraries.  She has worked in the library profession for more than 20 years in the area of technical services, with a focus on serials, e-resources, and acquisitions.  She is... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

From Chaos to Compliance: Purchasing Electronic Resources and Managing Collections Efficiently
Purchasing electronic resources for a state institution can be a very tedious process with so many rules and regulations. The state of Georgia is no exception. There is a constant need to stay on top of purchasing policies in order to make sure your current subscriptions stay accessible. Then there is the process of working with vendors so you can grow the collection which involves negotiating prices and working out contract differences. The University of West Georgia’s Ingram Library recently took on some procedural changes in an effort to simplify the process and increase communication. This has improved the acquisitions process and has allowed the Ingram Library to negotiate harder for new products, and the electronic collection has benefitted greatly. This session will cover the process of going from a chaotic process to one that is more streamlined and beneficial to the library and the vendors we deal with. Attendees are encouraged to share their own ever-changing licensing processes in an effort to share ideas that have been helpful. By the time of this session, the state of Georgia will have completely rolled out a new electronic purchasing software system, and the pros/cons and challenges to the current process will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Charlie Sicignano

Charlie Sicignano

Head of Technical Services, University of West Georgia
Acquisitions & Collection development, collection assessment, licensing of academic content


Friday November 9, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

From Novice to Expert…For the Motivated: An Exploratory Study of University Press Staff Adoption of E-Readers

Presented by Jane Nichols
Collection Development Librarian for Social Sciences & Humanities, Oregon State University 

Co-Authored by Evviva Weinraub
Director, Emerging Technologies and Services, Oregon State University Libraries.

Books and journal articles are the most familiar forms of disseminating scholarly research, however, the move from "ink-on-paper" to a digital format presents small presses with difficulties. Ebooks, eReaders and digital publishing demand that presses transform their publishing model and rethink their business practices. Challenges are wide ranging and numerous; inadequate resources hinder press staff ability to develop the necessary skills to create eBooks while lack of experience with eReading technology limits staff knowledge. With the barrier of device ownership removed, do publishing staff feel better prepared to create new services, develop their skills, and transform their practices?

Librarians at Oregon State University Libraries & Press recognized that our press staff lacked personal experience with eReading technology. We secured funding to distribute four different types of eReaders to the Press staff as part of a larger year-long study of eReader adoption and use. In this poster session we will explore some of the study’s findings and discuss how small presses face challenges as they move into digital publishing. We’ll also look at some of the emotional and intellectual factors influencing adoption or rejection of eReader technology by the Press staff; how their experience has changed their business and their thoughts on the future of the book.

 


Speakers
avatar for Jane Nichols

Jane Nichols

Social Sciences & Humanities Librarian, Oregon State University Libraries & Press
Jane Nichols is a Social Sciences & Humanities Librarian at OSUL&P where she focuses on Digital Humanities initiatives and Collection Development.


Friday November 9, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

Harvesting the Crop: Implementing a Usage Statistics Management System at Georgia State University

PDF of Poster

Gathering, comparing and analyzing usage data for a large collection of electronic resources is a time consuming and arduous process. In the past, limited resources necessitated that Georgia State University Library employ an electronic resources usage analysis strategy that was primarily point-of-need. In an effort to transition to a more systematic and proactive approach, the library acquired EBSCONET® Usage Consolidation in early 2012. Usage Consolidation allows GSU library to store, compile and report on our COUNTER compliant usage data within a single system. This session will provide an overview of GSU’s implementation process, highlight some of the unexpected challenges that occurred along the way, and explore the benefits of adopting the Usage Consolidation system. Attendees will also learn some common problems that occur in vendor supplied data as well as tips for wrangling deviant COUNTER reports into compliance. Audience members will be invited to share their own experiences of working with usage statistics management systems.


Speakers
TC

Tricia Clayton

Collection Assessment Librarian, Georgia State University Library
Tricia Clayton is the Collection Assessment Librarian at Georgia State University located in downtown Atlanta. As a member of the Collection Development department, her primary responsibilities include collection assessment, wrangling and interpreting usage statistics, and overseeing... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

Moving Towards Shibboleth Authentication: A Canadian Academic Library’s Perspective

Moving towards Shibboleth authentication has been a slow process for Canadian academic libraries. This poster session is intended to present an overview of the current status of Shibboleth implementation from a Canadian academic library’s perspective. The author will begin with needs analysis for Shibboleth authentication for a Canadian academic library, then proceed to explore the issues and challenges surrounding Shibboleth implementation, and finally discuss the key roles of the stakeholders as well as potential collaborations among them.

Attendees may expect to gain a better understanding of Shibboleth authentication from our experience. The author hopes to collect feedback and learn the best practices by communicating with the attendees. 

 


Speakers
HC

Heather Cai

Information Technology Services Librarian, McGill University
Heather Cai is the Information Technology Services Librarian at McGill University Library, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. In this position, she plans, coordinates and implements library systems projects, and provides support for the use of library information systems and applications... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

Patron Problems... or Opportunities for Improvement? It’s All In How You Look At It

Patron problem reports and access issues are obstacles that every Library is confronted with, large or small, public, academic, or special. But what turns these obstacles into opportunities? And how can, and should, customer feedback and complaints be used to improve local library processes and services? This talk will investigate ways in which the feedback provided through user problem reports can be used to improve local processes, and how one can begin to reframe this oft-overlooked library service as a vast and often untapped resource for improving library services overall. Our patrons are talking to us...are we listening?


Speakers
SM

Susan Marcin

Head of E-Resources Management: Technologies & User Experience, Columbia University Libraries
Susan Marcin is the Head of E-Resources Management: Technologies & User Experience for Columbia University Libraries, where her work focuses on the e-resources life cycle of acquisitions, access, administration, support, and evaluation.  She holds a BA from Trinity College in Hartford... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

Re-Thinking Acquisitions Workflow in a Shared – Bib Environment: Finding Workflow Solutions During a Time of Change at the University of South Florida Library

On June 28, 2012 the University of South Florida (USF) Library in partnership with the other libraries of the state university system transitioned to a shared catalog or Shared Bib Production Environment (SBPROD). This environment was created by taking existing bibliographic records from the individual library (Aleph) catalog environments and merging them to create an updated integrated (Aleph) library catalog environment. In responding to the new shared catalog environment, a team of acquisitions, electronic resource, and cataloging librarians as well as staff members at the USF Library coordinated efforts to review, plan and implement new workflow procedures. The new workflow procedures were designed to accommodate a growing emphasis on acquiring electronic books as directed by collection management policy decisions with an expanding purchase on demand program. The principal objectives the library team worked to find solutions for included:

  1. The integration of benchmarks related to cataloging and acquisitions processes needed to comply with new statewide shared bib best practices.
  2. The implementation of new acquisitions procedures for electronic books.
  3. The implementation of new procedures for budget control.
  4. Modifying existing acquisition workflows used for print materials to accommodate electronic resources to improve timely patron access to online content in a shared bib environment.

This poster session will benefit both new and veteran technical services librarians and staff who possess responsibilities in planning for and in the implementation of workflows in support of electronic resources acquisitions and purchase on demand programs during times of significant organizational and technological change.


Speakers
JA

John Abresch

Coordinator of Collections, University of South Florida
John Abresch is an Acquisitions/Collections Librarian in the Academic Resources Department at University of South Florida Library. John’s professional responsibilities are with acquisitions functions as well as engaging in collection planning activities. His research interests... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

The Future is Friendly: Getting the Biggest Bang for Your Buck from E-Content Collections

E-content has given researchers an increased level of convenience and an unprecedented level of access to knowledge through scholarly articles, but what effect has this had on how researchers seek information?

Do they provide good monetary value to higher education libraries and what are the wider benefits for universities and research institutions? Based on a CIBER report, there is a clear correlation between levels of use of e-content in multidisciplinary collections and research outcomes. More usage of interdisciplinary collections are linked to the number of papers published, as well as the number of PhD awards and income from research grants and contracts. This link is independent of institution size. It is true that we can no longer think of the different disciplines in their own silos, not interacting with each other. For this reason, acquiring e-content interdisciplinary collections makes perfect sense. It is no longer just a question of how much usage title X, Y or Z is having in a given year, but what impact those titles are having on our faculty and research communities. Budget crisis is not a new thing in academic libraries.

So the question is: Are you satisfied with the overall price for your package, and is the unit cost per article where you want it to be?

We should not forget that in the print world along with the pick and choose model, libraries do not hold much of the negotiating power. While also reminding ourselves that there is a completely different game plan when it comes to the purchase of an online database.


Speakers
JL

James Lingle

Director of Sales and Marketing, IGI Global
I became Director of Sales & Marketing at IGI Global in July 2012. Having worked as a publishing professional for over 25 years in both the US and UK, I have been fortunate to work through, and help implement many of the changes that have impacted our world in that time. As we have... Read More →
SO

Saeed Otufat-Shamsi

Senior Director of Sales and Marketing, IGI Global
A passionate professional in the field of Information Science and Technology Management with more than 18 years of career that has spun around applying and disseminating the latest information technology in multi-disciplines such as publishing, financial, telecommunication, and engineering... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom

2:00pm

Working Out Our Workflows: Visualizing Who Does What, When and How

After a new position for an Electronic Resources Librarian was created and filled at DePaul University, the Serials & Acquisition Librarian and the new Electronic Resources Librarian set up weekly meetings to work together to visually map out key processes. After some false starts, we found success with mapping out these processes using Visio and began tackling some of the less well defined of our processes. Creating visualizations of our workflows helped us to identify potential bottlenecks and to rethink our procedures, and this process also revealed areas of ambiguity in our current operations that we could address and eliminate.

Our poster will cover how we chose which processes to prioritize for mapping out, what problems we encountered when trying to visualize our workflows and how this work has concretely benefited our daily work. This should be useful to any librarian who wants to revisit, or more concretely document, their current workflows and procedures, and will be particularly helpful for those librarian who work in, or with, Electronics Resources and Acquisitions units.


Speakers
avatar for Amelia Brunskill

Amelia Brunskill

Coordinator of Collections & Scholarly Resources, DePaul University
Amelia Brunskill is the Coordinator of Collections & Scholarly Resources at DePaul University. She was previously DePaul's Electronic Resources Librarian and prior to that she was the Liaison Librarian for the Sciences at Dickinson College, in Carlisle, PA. She received her MSIS from... Read More →
NC

Nicole Casner

Serials & Acquisitions Coordinator, DePaul University Library


Friday November 9, 2012 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Courtyard Marriott Outside Cypress Ballroom